Beyond the Model Minority Myth: Investing in the Well-Being of the Asian American and Pacific Islander Community

Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPIs) are now the fastest growing racial group in the country, expected to more than double from 20 million to 47 million by 2060. With this tremendous growth comes the need to better understand and address issues of social equity and overall community well-being within this diverse community.


As you may know, AAPIs face the model minority myth – the notion that virtually all are well-educated, affluent, and self-sufficient. In reality, the AAPI community is not a monolithic group and each group faces unique challenges. One out of three AAPIs does not speak English fluently. Certain subgroups have low levels of educational attainment and high levels of unemployment. For example, 40 percent of Hmong Americans do not complete high school, and Pacific Islanders have among the highest unemployment rates of all racial and ethnic groups. And we cannot ignore the fact that more than two million AAPIs, representing over two dozen subgroups, live in poverty. Continue reading

September 11, 2015

Measuring Progress in the Housing Market

Photo: Row of homes.

We measure the health of our nation’s housing market with several important tools. Our latest housing scorecard gives us a closer look at the impact our policies and programs are having on American families. As we look back on August, we saw continued progress in our nation’s housing recovery take hold, including strength in existing home sales and a spike in new home sales. It’s clear we must continue supporting programs that will help more American families and homeowners recover from the Great Recession. Continue reading

August 28, 2015

Hurricane Katrina: Reflecting on Ten Years of Recovery

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Ten years ago, Hurricane Katrina slammed into the Gulf Coast displacing thousands of residents from their homes.

In the aftermath of the storm, Community Planning and Development Representative, Earl Randall was on the ground in New Orleans coordinating responses to Katrina on the HUD reconstitution team.

Now as the New Orleans Field Office Director, Earl reflects on 10 years of recovery and what it has meant for him personally and as a HUD employee.

Hurricane Katrina: Reflecting on Ten Years of Recovery